The Republic

The Republic

Most normal individuals in the modern world would assume that all books written, not published, by man are based on either a portion of the author?s imagination, an event (biased or non-biased) in either history or during the life of the author, a straight-out autobiography, or a generalized biography of another person they once knew. However, this philosophical novel fits none of the descriptions above. The book is actually an in-depth recording of a philosophy contest between Plato?s teacher Socrates and several other great philosophers. What is significant about this contest is that, in it, Socrates describes his personal view of a ?perfect world,? and why justice is so important in the process of creating a civilized world.
The novel was completed in 370 B.C., and it describes a strong debate between Socrates and five other speakers. The two main arguments that he illustrates in this novel are that a ruler cannot obtain more power than the state, and that a philosopher is best suited to rule a nation since he has the ability to maintain this balance. Also, Socrates claims that only the philosopher has traveled beyond the ?cave? of worldly desires and temptations to discover what justice really is.

socrates, justice, men, man, unjust, argument, philosophers, great, injustice, just, arguments, understanding, state, socrates?s, point, however, because, about, world, wisdom, thrasymachus, novel, book, therefore, opinion, debate, rulers, perfect, people, glaucon, stating, since, should, saying, ruler, rule